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Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo

Eduard, 1/48 scale

S u m m a r y

Catalogue Number: Eduard Kit No. 8161 - Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo
Scale: 1/48
Contents and Media: 156 olive coloured plastic parts; 40 photo-etched parts; markings for six aircraft; self-adhesive masks
Price: USD$39.95 plus shipping available online from Eduard's website
and specialist hobby retailers worldwide
Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages:

Accurate outline, superb fit, and crisp detail.  Impressive decal sheet caters for six subjects and has perfect registration with thin carrier film. Two frets make excellent use of both coloured and unpainted photo-etched parts.

Disadvantages:

Some minor detail changes needed to both the kit and decal sheet.

Recommendation: If you missed out on this kit the first time round, here’s your chance once again to pick up a wonderfully put together package.


Reviewed by Rob Baumgartner


Eduard's 1/48 scale Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo is available online from Squadron.com
 

FirstLook

 

Eduard’s version of the famous Fokker Dr.I was very much applauded when it first came out.

It was soon followed up by the “Dual Combo” and this also proved to be a popular release. So much so that it appears again with all the original markings and adornments.

As before, there are two complete triplanes in this boxing. Each example comprises 78 plastic parts, although not all of these items will be used with the options presented here.

 

  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
  • Eduard Fokker Dr.I Dual Combo Review by Rob Baumgartner: Image
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Photo-etched frets accompany these kits, and one of its main functions is to detail with the underneath of the forward fuselage. It does this admirably and much more besides. A total of 40 pieces are present which are shared between the two aircraft.

 

 

Amongst these photo-etched goodies are details for the machine guns, engine ignition harness, stitching, compass fittings, and cowl strap. This latter item fits perfectly around the plastic part and it’s also good to see the characteristic lip reproduced on the “hood”.

Eduard supplies the usual “office” components, so the floor, control column, rudder bar, and seat are all present. The rear linen screen is also provided as are the ammunition bins, Bosch engine magneto switch (moulded to the fuselage interior) and machine gun mounts.

To further enhance the cockpit there is another fret of p-e. This time it’s in colour with seatbelts, instrument faces, auxiliary throttle, and compass correction chart. When the plastic parts are included, there is very little for the modeler to add.

Moulded into the fuselage halves are the triangular plywood formers which accompanies the separate internal tubular structure. 

Everything fits together perfectly when the two halves are joined.

The wings are single piece affairs and feature clean crisp detailing. This consists of raised rib tapes flanked by fine engraved lines and careful examination also reveals the subtle presence of stitching.
The bottom wing fits cleverly into a slot in the fuselage and when the other wings are added, they all align perfectly thanks to the single length struts.

Separate ailerons, elevators and rudder allow for easy animation of your subject and it’s refreshing to see both fuel and oil filler caps represented on the aircraft.

As good as the kit is…there are a couple of things that need a bit of tweaking. First is the celluloid inspection window on top of the upper wing and this should be moved forward. It was there to allow the works number and date of spar manufacture to be read.

The kit also portrays fasteners on the undercarriage wing. This assumes that the lifting surface could be split for maintenance purposes but that was not the case. A quick sanding of these details will put things right.

While you’re at it, add the rectangular opening seen at each end of the axial fairing which provided access to the bungee cords. A couple of blast plates beneath the gun muzzles won’t go amiss either.


 

Markings

An impressive decal sheet allows for six subjects.

Eagle eyed modellers will find that these do not correspond to those schemes displayed on the side of the boxtop. Korner’s triplane has been substituted for that belonging to Weiss, presumably because the former’s personal insignia would not fit on the decal sheet.

All items were in perfect register with thin carrier film and opaque colours. A bonus is the included stencil data and Axial propeller logos which are sharply printed and perfectly legible. Those that used the supplied coloured p-e instrument faces will find their spares box enriched with the equivalent items found on the decals.

 

 

There is one frustrating anomaly that is carried over from the original sheet and that’s the way in which the serial number is displayed. The “I” in “Fok DR I” is the same size as the rest of the characters when photographs clearly show this isn’t so.

Fokker Dr.I flown by Ltn. Hermann Frommherz, Jasta Boelcke, May 1918

Frommherz survived the war after amassing a total of 32 victories. He was nominated for the “Blue Max” but the ending of the war precluded him from gaining it. He stayed active in aviation and joined the Luftwaffe where he commanded I Gruppe JG134. He also survived this war to finally pass away on 30 December 1964 of a heart attack.

Fokker Dr.I 564/17, flown by Ltn. Werner Steinhauser, Jasta 11, April 1918

Steinhauser started his scoring flying for FA(A)261. He had 4 victories to his credit before being wounded in combat on 17 March 1918. There were 6 more aircraft added to his total before he lost his life on 26 June 1918 due to the accurate shooting of a SPAD 2-seater.

Fokker Dr.I 545/17, flown by Ltn. Hans Weiss, Jasta 11, Cappy, April 1918

Weiss was fatally wounded in this aircraft on 2 May 1918. He scored 18 victories (5 of which were balloons) before being shot in the head by Ltn. M S Taylor of 209 Sqn.

Fokker Dr.I 213/17, flown by Ltn. Friedrich Kempf.

Although Kempf never made “acedom”, his aircraft has always been a popular one. The wording on the middle wing roughly translates to “Remember me still?” He survived the war and finished with 4 victories and died in August 1966. Purists may want to add the auxiliary struts to the axial wing which is seen on this and a few other Jasta Boelcke aircraft.

Fokker Dr.I 577/17, flown by Ltn. Rudolf Klimke, Jasta 27, Halluin-Ost, May 1918

Klimke’s total was 17 victories, two of which were claimed before he became a fighter pilot. One of these was with FA55 on the Russian Front and the other occurred when flying in a Gotha of KG3 during a raid on London.  The anchor represented a good luck symbol for Klimke and was introduced at his mother’s request.

Fokker Dr.I 404/17, flown by Ltn. Hptm. Adolf von Tutschek, JG II, Toulis, March 1918

Like many airman, von Tutschek became a pilot after having first been wounded as an infantryman. After having reached 20 victories he was awarded the Pour le Merite on 3 August 1917. He survived being severely wounded by Flight Commander C D Booker of 8 Naval Sqn. but lost his life when brought down by the SE5a of Ltn. H B Redler of 24 Sqn. This was Redler’s 4th victory of an eventual 10 which left the German pilot's tally at 27.



 

Conclusion

 

Eduard’s Fokker triplane is easily the best of the breed so far.

Despite this is there are still a couple of things that will benefit from the modeller’s attention. Fortunately none are beyond the skills of even the novice builder.

The detail is exquisite and the ease of the build is testimony to the skill of the designers.

So if you missed out on this kit the first time round, here’s your chance once again to pick up a wonderfully put together package.

Thanks to Eduard for the sample


Review Text and Images Copyright 2010 by Rob Baumgartner
Page Created 18 January, 2010
Last updated 18 January, 2010

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