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Hunting Jet Provost T.3 / T.4


Czech Master Resin, 1/72 scale

S u m m a r y :

Catalogue Number:

Czech Master Resin Kit No. 192

Scale:

1/72

Contents & Media

27 x cream resin airframe parts, 10 x black resin undercarriage and flap hinge parts, 1 x Eduard coloured photo-etch (PE) fret of approx. 65 parts,  2 x vac-from acetate canopies, 1 x clear resin rear decking, 1 x  Eduard pre-cut mask, and decals for 5 subjects

Price:

Available online from Hannants for £32.09, West Coast Hobbys for Cn$43.00, and various other CMR stockists.

Review Type:

First Look

Advantages:

Highly detailed and very comprehensive kit.

Disadvantages:

None apparent.

Conclusions:

Possibly more suited to modellers with some resin and multi-media experience.  A superb kit.

 

Reviewed by Mark Davies


HyperScale is proudly supported by Squadron.com

 

Background

 

The RAF’s first jet trainers were developments of its Meteor and Vampire frontline fighters, but by the mid-1950’s the RAF wanted a dedicated jet trainer design. Hunting Percival’s response was an aircraft with a side-by-side seating configuration developed somewhat from their piston engined Provost trainer. The prototype first flew in 1954 and an initial order was placed for 10 Jet Provost T.1’s to be used over a four-year trial period. The seating arrangement suited the RAF very well, and an order for a more developed version of the Jet Provost followed on from the trial.

The follow-on aircraft was the T.3. Compared to the T.1 it had ejector seats, upgraded avionics, tip tanks, less framing on the canopy and other less noticeable changes like a strengthened undercarriage. 201 T.3’s were delivered, along with 70 T.3A’s that featured different avionics. The T.4 introduced a more powerful engine, whilst the T.5 had cockpit pressurisation, a longer nose, and a different style sliding canopy. The T.51, T.52 and T.55 were export versions based on the T.3, T.4 and T.5 respectively.  The final development in the line was the Strikemaster, being a ground light attack development of the T.5.

 

 

FirstLook

 

When it comes to Jet Provost kits in 1/72 I’m aware of a basic resin kit of the T.1 by Protojets, the very old and simple injected Airfix T.3, and T.5/Strikemaster kits from both Airfix and Matchbox. (And of course Matchbox did quite a nice piston engined Provost).  Suffice to say that a modern hi-tech CMR kit of the T.3/T.4 is sure to be welcomed by fans of RAF types and jet trainers generally.

The kit comes packaged in CMR’s now standard sturdy top opening box. The parts and decals are in heat sealed plastic bags, which in turn are sealed in a further bag with the instructions and photo-walkaround.

 

  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
  • CMR 1/72 Jet Provost Review by Mark Davies: Image
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The straightforward instructions consist of double-sided A4 pages (see here). The parts map and constructional illustrations are very clear and easy to follow. More double-sided pages give comprehensive painting and decal guide. Colour notes and other written instructions are in English. More pages provide a photo walkaround focused on various detail aspects of the aircraft.

The kit’s resin parts are in CMR’s usual cream resin, and very nicely moulded with minimal presence of pinholes. A little flash is evident in some places, but this can be removed easily and in seconds. The undercarriage and flap actuators are cast in a black resin that provides greater strength than the cream resin for fine weight-bearing parts.

The kit is awash with detail. Considerable attention to detail has been paid to the cockpit and wheel wells. Detail levels are further enhanced by the pre-coloured Eduard PE set provided. Flaps can be modelled up or down, and come mount on black resin hinges for added strength.

 

 

The kit’s canopy comes as in the usual vac-form acetate, of which two copies provide for insurance or practice when cutting out. The canopy can be cut to hinge off a clear resin section that forms the rear decking with two upward facing clear panels. A quick polish and some Future will help make the most of this part.  The canopy comes with an Eduard pre-cut mask which serves to make life easy when it comes to painting. (Regrettably, low-angle winter sun and my lack of photography skills mean I only have a rather poor photo of these parts due to reflection problems.)

Decals are typical of CMR, being well registered and suggest good opacity. Markings for one South Arabian Federation Air Force and four RAF schemes are included.

 

 

These are all colourful and attractive options in my opinion.

 

Conclusion

 

This is a superbly executed kit with high levels of detail, yet it looks to be a fairly simple build.

Highly recommended.

Thanks to Czech Master Resin for this review sample.


CMR Models are available online from Hannants in the UK,
Red Roo Models in Australia and quality specialist model retailers worldwide.


Text Copyright 2010 by Mark Davies
This Page Created on 23 June, 2010
Last updated 23 June, 2010

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