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TaktLwG 73 “Steinhoff”
Parts 1 & 2

Modern Luftwaffe Unit History Series

by Daniel Kehl

AirDOC

S u m m a r y

Publisher and Title:

TaktLwG 73 “Steinhoff” Parts 1 & 2
ADL #011 and ADL #012
by Daniel Kehl
Modern Luftwaffe Unit History Series
AirDOC
2018

ISBN: 978-3-935687-23-2 and 978-3-935687-23-9
Media: Each 64 pages A4 format, soft cover
Price:


Each Euro 16.95 plus shipping available online from Shop of Phantoms

#011 GBP£10.33 plus shipping available online from Hannants

and stockists worldwide.

Review Type: First Read
Advantages: Quality images of a useful size, well captioned, and an interesting coverage of the equipment of the modern Luftwaffe from its early years until the end of the 20th century.
Disadvantages: None noted.
Conclusion:

If you have an interest in the development of the modern Luftwaffe and its equipment then you will find these two volumes very useful.


Reviewed by Graham Carter



 

FirstRead

 

These two 64-page A4 books are meant to be used as a pair as the pages are numbered sequentially. They are printed on quality semi-gloss paper with stiffer glossy card covers with a montage of lovely colour photos. These are essentially photo albums of these units in the modern Luftwaffe.

Part 1 covers the period 1959 to 1975 when the “Steinhoff” was made up of JG73, JaboG 42 and LeKG 42 used mainly F86 Sabres ( but also a few T33s) and then Fiat G91s while Part 2 runs from 1975 until 1997 and the units JaboG 35 and JG73 the they used the F-4 Phantoms in a couple of guises. 

 

 

Each book is primarily in German with an English translation on the right hand side and begin with an introductory description of each unit, its history, equipment and bases.

 

 

The coverage of the aircraft consists of masses of photos, both B&W and colour, most of them from private sources and many showing them in informal situations with crews and ground equipment. The rear inside cover of Part 1 features the commanding officers of the units. 

 

 

Part 2 deals almost exclusively with the Luftwaffe’s use of the F4F Phantom in various scenarios, including display teams and changing colour schemes. Of interest are images of former East German equipment taken on by the Luftwaffe, such as the MiG21, MiG29 and Sukhoi Su25.

 

 

All photos are well reproduced, of a good size and captioned in German and English and will be of use and interest to both the modeller and the aviation historian. As well, many shots cover the aircraft and ground equipment in ‘relaxed’ poses , with personnel or being serviced to expose interior details so that they lend themselves to diorama ideas.

 

 

These books will be welcomed by both the modeller and the Luftwaffe history buff. Recommended to those of you with an interest in these areas.

 

 

Conclusion

 

If you have an interest in the development of the modern Luftwaffe and its equipment then you will find these two volumes very useful..

Thanks to Double Ugly Books for the sample.


Review Copyright 2021 by Graham Carter
This Page Created on 20 September, 2021
Last updated 20 September, 2021

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