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Yokosuka MXY-7
Ohka Model 22

Brengun, 1/72 scale

S u m m a r y :

Catalogue Number:

Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22

Scale:

1/72

Contents & Media

One grey injected moulded sprue, resin parts, decals and A5 folded instructions.

Price:

12.71€ plus shipping available online from Brengun

 

GBP£11.50 EU / £9.58 Export Price plus shipping available online from Hannants

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Review Type:

First Look.

Advantages:

Brengun offer some small scale unusual subjects and the Japanese Ohka is one of these. Simple construction, reasonable detail.

Disadvantages:

There is some flash to deal with and larger sprue gates to clean up.

Conclusions:

Brengun continue to give us options in the small scales and this Ohka Trainer is a good option that fills a hole in the 1/72 scale Japanese subjects.


Reviewed by David Couche


Eduard's 1/72 Avia B.534 IV serie Weekend Edition is available online from Squadron.com

 

Background

 

The Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka was a purpose-built, rocket-powered human-guided kamikaze attack aircraft employed by Japan against Allied ships towards the end of World War II.

The Ohka Model 22 suicide attacker, powered by a Ishikawajima Tsu-11 thermo-jet engine with reduced span wings and 600 kg (1,300 lb) warhead, to be carried by Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga bombers. 50 built by the First Naval Air Technical Arsenal were never used.

 

 

Near the end of World War II, Vice Admiral Onishi Takijiro recommended that the Japanese navy form special groups of men and aircraft to attack the American warships gathering to conduct amphibious landings in the Philippines. The Japanese used the word Tokko-tai (Special Attack) to describe these units. To the Allies, they became known as the kamikaze. By war's end, some 5,000 pilots died making Tokko attacks.

The Ohka (Cherry Blossom) Model 22 was designed to allow a pilot with minimal training to drop from a Japanese navy bomber and guide his aircraft with its warhead at high speed into an Allied warship. Plans were afoot in 1944 to adapt a version of the Yokosuka P1Y Ginga (Milky Way, Allied codename FRANCIS, see NASM collection) to carry the Model 22. While several rocket-powered Ohka 11s still exist, there is only Ohka 22 one surviving version powered by a motor-jet, which consisted of a reciprocating engine that pressurized a combustion chamber into which fuel was injected and ignited. Allied forces recovered the Ohka 22 in Japan in 1945. Unlike the Ohka 11, the Ohka 22 never became operational.

 

 

FirstLook

 

Brengun has given us another interesting subject, especially for those modelling Japanese WWII aircraft. Very few of these kits have graced the shelves of model shops over the years, mainly available as expensive resin kits. Brengun have released a neat injected moulded version for the “Gentlemen's Scale”.

The kit has one grey sprue only with 18 parts.

 

  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
  • Brengun Kit No. BRP72034 - Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka Model 22 Review by David Couche: Image
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The parts have quite reasonable detail but, as is often found with limited run kits, has some small flash to clean up before construction and some quite large sprue gates which will take some cleaning up. I believe, whilst simple in parts count, some careful fitting will be required in its construction. 

 

 

It also supples a set of 10 resin cast parts used to create a set of stands for the Ohka as it had no wheels or skids as it was never meant to land. There is one further resin part to be added to the main airframe.

 

 

Once again Brengun provides a comprehensive set of decals, which appear to be in good register and not too thick with only a limited number used on this aircraft. The model 22 Ohka did not have Hinomaru but just some data stencilling and cherry blossom motif on the nose.

 

 

The instructions are clear and leave no doubts to the placement of all parts. There are colour call outs for interior details etc, but the list is just a list of colours, not linked to any paint manufacturer at all. I think it’s pick the nearest paint colour of your favourite brand and go from there.

The scheme provided on the back of the box is that of the only rescued airframe that is in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

 

 

Conclusion

 

I think Brengun has hit the mark for an interesting and not often released Japanese aircraft.

This little kit is just crying out for a weekend build and is easily possible if using acrylic paints to speed up the process. I personally, with my interesting in Japanese subjects will be doing exactly that in the near future.

I would recommend this to the Japanese air modeller and to anyone wanting a quick, fairly simple build kit

Thanks to Brengun for the review sample.


Review Text and Images Copyright 2019 by David Couche
Page Created 11 October, 2019
Last updated 11 October, 2019

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